Wild Blackberry

The flower of the wild blackberry…Have a wonderful day everyone!

Copyright © 2012/ D L Ennis

Pink Lady’s Slipper

A native spring wildflower growing in our woodland garden…

Copyright © 2012/ D L Ennis

Lady’s Slipper

Lady’s slipper orchids, lady slipper orchids or slipper orchids are the orchids in the subfamily Cypripedioidea, which includes the genera Cypripedium, Mexipedium, Paphiopedilum, Phragmipedium and Selenipedium. They are characterised by the slipper-shaped pouches (modified labellums) of the flowers – the pouch traps insects so they are forced to climb up past the staminode, behind which they collect or deposit pollinia, thus fertilising the flower.

This subfamily has been considered by some to be a family Cypripediaceae, separate from the Orchidaceae.

The subfamily Cypripedioideae is monophyletic and consists of five genera. Their common features are two fertile diandrous (that is, with two perfect stamens) anthers, a shield-shaped staminode and a saccate (sac-shaped) lip.

The Cypripedium genus is found across much of North America, as well as in parts of Europe and Asia. The state flower of Minnesota is the Showy Lady’s Slipper (Cypripedium reginae). The Lady’s Slipper is also the official provincial flower of Prince Edward Island, a province of Canada.

Paphiopedilums are found in the tropical forests of southeast Asia reaching as far north as southern China. Paphiopedilum is quite easy to cultivate and therefore is popular among orchid enthusiasts. In fact, overcollecting of this genus has caused some problems in its original habitat.

Phragmipedium, found across northern South and Central America, is also easy to cultivate as it requires lower temperatures than Paphiopedilum, eliminating the need for a greenhouse in many areas.

The lady’s slipper is also known in the United States of America as the moccasin flower, from its resemblance to a shoe or moccasin.

The once thought extinct flower is now legally protected from cultivation. This variety of orchid was spotted at a a golf course in Lancashire England and daily patrols are made to ensure its safety.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cypripedioideae
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Queen Ann’s Lace (Daucus carot)

Queen Anne’s Lace, also called “Wild Carrot,” is a common plant in dry fields, ditches, and open areas. It was introduced from Europe, and the carrots that we eat today were once cultivated from this plant.

Queen Anne’s Lace grows up to four feet tall. Its leaves are two to eight inches long and fern-like. This plant is best known for its flowers, which are tiny and white, blooming in lacy, flat-topped clusters. Each little flower has a dark, purplish center.

The fruits of Queen Anne’s Lace are spiky, and they curl inward to build a “birds’ nest” shape.

This plant blooms from May to October. It is a biennial plant, which means it lives for two years. It will spend the first year growing bigger, and then bloom the second year.

© 2010 D L Ennis, All rights reserved

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The Gathering of Popes

The Meeting of Popes

Our native daylily…

© 2009 D L Ennis, All rights reserved.

NOTE: Permission for the use of my images is granted for personal websites and blogs but is to include a link back to this site and proper credit given to me, D L Ennis. Link to be used…(Visual Thoughts https://dlennis.wordpress.com/)

NOTE: Commercial use, and the creation of prints, must be purchased! For more information you can contact me here.

Portrait of a Flower

Portrait of a Flower

Wildflower…

© 2009 D L Ennis, All rights reserved.

NOTE: Permission for the use of my images is granted for personal websites and blogs but is to include a link back to this site and proper credit given to me, D L Ennis. Link to be used…(Visual Thoughts https://dlennis.wordpress.com/)

NOTE: Commercial use, and the creation of prints, must be purchased! For more information you can contact me here.

Petite

Petite

A tiny wildflower in the daisy family…

© 2009 D L Ennis, All rights reserved.

NOTE: Permission for the use of my images is granted for personal websites and blogs but is to include a link back to this site and proper credit given to me, D L Ennis. Link to be used…(Visual Thoughts https://dlennis.wordpress.com/)

NOTE: Commercial use, and the creation of prints, must be purchased! For more information you can contact me here.